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C1-level courses

Advanced Module [B2/C1] (8 contact hours per week)

University studies and communication – absorbing, dealing with, and exchanging information and complex matters

Students who have obtained the DSH 1 qualification from Freie Universität Berlin and who are enrolled on a temporary basis for max. two semesters are required to attend an Advanced Module during the semester alongside their regular studies.

Remaining course places may be given to people in the following groups provided they obtain an appropriate score in the placement test:

  • Exchange students
  • Students in English-language degree programs
  • Students in German-language degree programs who are fully enrolled and who have not obtained a DSH qualification from Freie Universität Berlin
  • Doctoral candidates
  • Researchers and employees

Students who have obtained the DSH 1 qualification from Freie Universität Berlin:

Exchange students, students in English-language degree programs, students in German-language degree programs who are fully enrolled and who have not obtained a DSH from Freie Universität Berlin, doctoral candidates, researchers, employees:

  • Application to register for a course submitted in good time using the online form on our website
  • Completion of Language Center placement test or grade from language course previously attended at Freie Universität

10 credit points

Students who have obtained the DSH 1 qualification from Freie Universität Berlin:

  • Regular attendance (85%)
  • Active participation in the course (i.e., completion of a six-page portfolio of written texts/homework, featuring a first version and an edited version of each – as well as an analysis of the errors made)
  • Successfully pass the DSH examination to level DSH 2 or DSH 3

 

10 credit points / ECTS

Exchange students, students in English-language degree programs, students in German-language degree programs who are fully enrolled and who have not obtained a DSH qualification from Freie Universität Berlin, doctoral candidates, researchers, employees:

  • Regular attendance (85%)
  • Active participation in the course (actively taking part and completing written assignments)
  • Students are expected to complete six pages’ worth of written texts/homework over the duration of the course, featuring a first version and an edited version of each – as well as an analysis of the errors made

 

Bachelor students can complete the course as part of the “ABV” (General Professional Skills) section of their studies (foreign language skills).

General Focus:

Deal with and acquire knowledge of forms of oral and written communication relevant to university studies, practice strategies for gaining and developing an understanding of texts based on socially relevant texts of general interest

  • Understand academic texts and identify their main points precisely and in a detailed manner
  • Outline reasons, objections, and arguments
  • Summarize and repeat information, present facts in a structured, balanced manner
  • Give personal assessments and express a personal opinion
  • Develop and expand academically relevant vocabulary and science-related means of expression

Learning Objectives:

After completing this course, students will have the following

linguistic skills:

  • The ability to understand complex factual texts in relative detail and understand the structure and thought process behind them
  • The ability to rearrange texts based on other criteria (chronologically, systematically)
  • The ability to identify an author’s perspective and opinion on a matter provided this is expressed explicitly and without the use of irony or insinuation
  • The ability to summarize, organize, and weigh information from different sources
  • The ability to express themselves orally and in writing in a clear and confident manner when it comes to topics of general interest
  • The confidence to join in with conversations and discussions at university

strategic skills:

  • A number of strategies for comparing expectations with what a text actually says
  • A number of strategies for ensuring they understand references contained within a text
  • A number of strategies for planning, organizing, and writing their own texts
  • A number of strategies for managing their own learning processes

intercultural skills:

  • The sensitivity to examine differences in behavior, communication, and approaches to a problem based on different cultural backgrounds

Course Topics:

Language acquisition – Illiteracy – Nonverbal communication – Interculturalism – Language and how we perceive space – Biographies – Women in science and research – Biotechnology – Genetic engineering – Games – Laughter – Aggression – Time – Society and Crises – Stress – Sleep – Animal testing for research purposes – Media and communication, etc.

Foundation Module [B2/C1] (4 contact hours per week)

Interpreting and producing texts in academia

  • Students who have obtained the DSH 1 qualification from Freie Universität Berlin and have already completed an Advanced Module but have not yet obtained the DSH 2 qualification and are enrolled on a temporary basis for a maximum of two semesters
  • Exchange students
  • Students in English-language degree programs
  • Students in German-language degree programs who are fully enrolled and who have not obtained a DSH qualification from Freie Universität Berlin
  • Doctoral candidates
  • Researchers and employees

Students who have obtained the DSH 1 qualification from Freie Universität Berlin and have completed an Advanced Module:

Exchange students, students in English-language degree programs, students in German-language degree programs who are fully enrolled and who have not obtained a DSH qualification from Freie Universität Berlin, doctoral candidates, researchers, employees:

  • Application to register for a course submitted in good time using the online form on our website
  • Completion of Language Center placement test or grade from language course previously attended at Freie Universität

5 credit points

Students who have obtained the DSH 1 qualification from Freie Universität Berlin and have already completed an Advanced Module but have not yet obtained the DSH 2 qualification:

  • Regular attendance (85%)
  • Active participation in the course (i.e., completion of an eight-page portfolio of written texts/homework, featuring a first draft and an edited version of each – as well as an analysis of the errors made)
  • Successfully pass the DSH examination to level DSH 2 or DSH 3

Exception: Students who previously fulfilled the requirement of regular attendance and active participation in the Advanced Module will receive 10 credit points for the Advanced Module after successfully passing the DSH examination to level DSH 2 or DSH 3. They will not receive any credits for the Foundation Module.

 

5 credit points / ECTS

Exchange students, students in English-language degree programs, students in German-language degree programs who are fully enrolled and who have not obtained a DSH qualification from Freie Universität Berlin, doctoral candidates, researchers, employees:

  • Regular attendance (85%)
  • Active participation in the course (actively taking part and completing written assignments)
  • Students are expected to complete eight pages’ worth of written texts/homework over the duration of the course, featuring a first draft and an edited version of each – as well as an analysis of the errors made

 

Bachelor students can complete the course as part of the “ABV” (General Professional Skills) section of their studies (foreign language skills).

General Focus:

Deal with and acquire knowledge of forms of communication relevant to university studies, practice strategies for gaining and developing an understanding of texts on the basis of argumentative factual texts

  • Interpret and produce argumentative factual texts of a generally academic nature
  • Apply techniques for planning and writing structured texts, as well as (self-)correct them in a targeted manner
  • Deepen knowledge of complex grammatical structures
  • Systematically build up a vocabulary of abstract, academically relevant terms

Learning Objectives:

After completing this course, students will have in-depth knowledge and skills at level C1.1 CEFR. The focus is on

  • developing writing skills that enable students to participate effectively in academic life and to use the language effectively in their studies
  • deepening and improving reading skills that enable them to understand more complex factual texts in relative detail
  • deepening and expanding upon structural knowledge in a practical manner

Students will have the following

linguistic skills:

  • The ability to break down complex information from a variety of sources in a targeted manner
  • The ability to present information, weigh and assess arguments, and convey points of view

strategic skills:

  • The ability to effectively and constructively communicate information, explanations, and points of view

intercultural skills:

  • The cultural sensitivity to effectively and constructively communicate information, explanations, and points of view and to question possible differences regarding their reception

Course Topics:

Famous Freie Universität Berlin figures – the limitations of growth – civic engagement – creativity – self-optimization – the psychology of giving – public holidays – the future of living – global insect decline – mobility in the future – unconditional basic income

Specialization Module A [C1] (4 contact hours per week)

Interacting in a (professional) academic context – Interpreting and producing complex texts

  • Students in German-language degree programs who are fully enrolled
  • Exchange students
  • Students in English-language degree programs
  • Doctoral candidates
  • Researchers and employees

5 credit points / ECTS

Coursework (during the semester)

  • Regular and active participation
  • Regular completion of homework
  • Completion of an oral assignment (participation in the science slam)

Module assessment

  • Completion of a written assignment (approx. eight pages in length), featuring both a first draft and an edited version, to be submitted by the end of the semester.

Bachelor students can complete the course as part of the “ABV” (General Professional Skills) section of their studies (foreign language skills).

General Focus:

Interacting in a (professional) academic context:

  • Interpret and produce complex texts
  • Deal with different types of texts in a critical manner
  • Implement approaches and strategies for interpreting input based on the premise, the question, and the objective
  • Employ a range of techniques for planning and writing structured texts and speeches that take into consideration different target audiences and contexts
  • Deepen knowledge of complex grammatical structures, systematically expand vocabulary and understanding of abstract terms

Learning Objectives:

After completing this course, students will master basic skills at level C1 CEFR.

Students will have the following

linguistic skills:

  • The ability to prepare, portray, and adequately present information using sources (including those that may contradict one another)
  • The ability to quickly and reliably identify specific problems in large, heterogeneous texts
  • The ability to effectively and constructively present information, explanations, and points of view in a variety of ways using different linguistically redundant techniques

strategic skills:

  • The ability to effectively and constructively communicate information, explanations, and points of view

intercultural skills:

  • The ability to effectively and constructively communicate information, explanations, and points of view

Course Topics:

Science and academia – experiments – reading – perception and memory – family structures – music – zoos – traveling – inclusive language – moral dilemmas – linguistics – siblings

Specialization Module B [C1] (4 contact hours per week)

Forms of discourse at university and in the world of work – presenting, arguing, discussing, criticizing

  • Students in German-language degree programs who are fully enrolled
  • Exchange students
  • Students in English-language degree programs
  • Doctoral candidates
  • Researchers and employees

5 credit points / ECTS

Coursework (during the semester)

  • Regular and active participation
  • Regular completion of homework
  • Completion of an oral assignment (participation in a panel discussion)

Module assessment

  • Completion of a written assignment (approx. eight pages in length), featuring both a first draft and an edited version, to be submitted by the end of the semester.

Bachelor students can complete the course as part of the “ABV” (General Professional Skills) section of their studies (foreign language skills).

General Focus:

Develop and practice the following linguistic, methodological, strategic, and knowledge-based skills required both in university contexts and in the professional world by working with a variety of texts from across culture and society:

  • Critical reading/listening skills – The ability to understand complex information, the author’s intentions, and the communicative function and objective of a text
  • (Rhetoric) skills for processing information, including implicit assumptions and the consequences thereof
  • The ability to focus on a certain topic/intention; present information in a manner that is relevant to the target audience and that takes intercultural aspects into consideration

Learning Objectives:

After completing this course, students will master basic skills at level C1 CEFR.

Students will have the following

linguistic skills:

  • The ability to work with sources effectively and with a goal in mind, to link heterogeneous material to their own research questions, and to present such information in a systematic manner
  • The ability to precisely summarize complex information and compose convincing oral or written explanations of abstract or complex topics 
  • The ability to present information to nonspecialists in a well-structured, comprehensible manner
  • The ability to critically read texts to gather detailed, precise information, as well as more implicit information (e.g., the author’s point of view)
  • The ability to flexibly and precisely apply a broad spectrum of linguistic techniques

strategic skills:

  • A comprehensive repertoire of strategies for interpreting texts, as well as for planning and writing their own texts, and the ability to apply these automatically in a stylistically appropriate manner
  • A number of strategies for editing their own work and improving their own language skills

intercultural skills:

  • The ability to recognize and account for cultural differences and influences when it comes to topics/conventions surrounding the university

Course Topics:

History of European universities – education and vocational training – scientific and academic explanations – pheromones – robotics – time – colors – heroes in sport and society – cultural aspects of thinking – Darwin’s theory of evolution – Crowds and Power

Specialization Module C [C1] (4 contact hours per week)

Working with texts – Working on texts

  • Students in German-language degree programs who are fully enrolled
  • Exchange students
  • Students in English-language degree programs
  • Doctoral candidates
  • Researchers and employees

5 credit points / ECTS

Coursework (during the semester)

  • Regular and active participation
  • Regular completion of homework
  • Completion of an oral assignment (analysis and presentation on a complex issue related to one of the course topics)

Module assessment

  • Completion of a written assignment (approx. eight pages in length), featuring both a first draft and an edited version, to be submitted by the end of the semester.

Bachelor students can complete the course as part of the “ABV” (General Professional Skills) section of their studies (foreign language skills).

General Focus:

Develop the skills required for dealing with tasks in an academic and professional context, in particular linguistic and verbal reasoning skills and the ability to address abstract terms and intellectual concepts, as well as intercultural and transnational topics and questions:

  • Process facts, information, complex issues, and correlations in a structured manner
  • Produce written and spoken texts
  • Targeted, systematic vocabulary work
  • Deal with selected difficult grammatical phenomena

Learning Objectives:

After completing this course, students will master basic skills at level C1 CEFR.

Students will have the following

linguistic skills:

  • The ability to use language in a problem-oriented and subject-relevant manner, both at university and in other context
  • The ability to present abstract, complex information in a convincing, audience-appropriate manner
  • The ability to constructively contribute to debates by responding to others with relevant information
  • The ability to recognize complex arguments in difficult texts and understand implicit clues regarding the author’s stance
  • The ability to confidently implement linguistic techniques to describe information in a differentiated, balanced, and nuanced manner

strategic skills:

  • Complex presentation techniques that they can use in an appropriate manner based on the information to be presented and target audience
  • The ability to recognize and implement a series of strategies for interpreting texts, as well as for planning and producing their own texts
  • A number of strategies for editing their own work and improving their language skills

intercultural skills:

  • The ability to recognize and account for cultural influences when it comes to discourse on the binational or multinational level

Course Topics:

Academic and scientific work – the concept of academia – plagiarism – procrastination – Europe – dealing with history: commemorating and remembering – the purpose of reading – working with and on literary texts – luxury food and drink – beauty – happiness